Weekly Blog No 117 – Suffragettes

Some historical facts about suffragette movement

Suffragette

A woman seeking a right to vote through organised protest.

Suffragettes campaigned to change the law, to grant women the right to vote. On the 6th February 2018, marked a 100 years since women were given the right to vote in the United Kingdom. Although the legalisation was passed in 1918, it was only for women over the age of 30 who could actually vote if they met the minimum property qualifications or were married to a man who did.

Not all suffragists were women, another term used for man and women. George Lansbury resigned as a MP, from the House of Commons over the issue. George was arrested at a suffragette rally in 1913 after speaking in support.

Suffragettes were imprisoned for minor offences for instance protesting, resisting arrest or smashing a window.

The suffragettes in prison went on hunger strike and were force fed, which was invasive, demeaning and dangerous.

The Royal Albert Hall, London was hired for suffragette rallies between 1908 – 2013. They were also the first group to be banned from the Hall due to disruption and costly damage.

Lady Nancy Astor was the first woman to stand for Parliament. The suffragettes were shocked that the first woman elected for parliament played no part in the suffragette movement. She should have won them round by fighting for woman causes.

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